Essay on canonization

Roman Catholic Saints! If you believe, like me, that the Roman Catholic Church established by Christ Himself is the most beautiful thing this side of heaven, then you also understand the importance of the lives of the saints. All throughout history the Church has produced great saints, proving that the Church is holy and able to provide us with what we need to reach sanctity. In reading the lives of the saints, we see that the saints each reflect, in a unique way, a special facet or virtue of God Himself. Learning about Catholic saints and their lives can inspire us to reach the summit of perfection that God wills for each of us.

. Crane, in his essay "The Critical Monism of Cleanth Brooks", argues strongly against Brooks' centrality of paradox. For one, Brooks believes that the very structure of poetry is paradox, and ignores the other subtleties of imagination and power that poets bring to their poems. Brooks simply believed that "'imagination' reveals itself in the balance or reconciliation of opposite or discordant qualities". [7] Brooks, in leaning on the crutch of paradox, only discusses the truth which poetry can reveal, and speaks nothing about the pleasure it can give. (231) Also, by defining poetry as uniquely having a structure of paradox, Brooks ignores the power of paradox in everyday conversation and discourse, including scientific discourse, which Brooks claimed was opposed to poetry. Crane claims that, using Brooks' definition of poetry, the most powerful paradoxical poem in modern history is Einstein's formula E = mc 2 , which is a profound paradox in that matter and energy are the same thing. The argument for the centrality of paradox (and irony) becomes a reductio ad absurdum and is therefore void (or at least ineffective) for literary analysis.

Donne is a realist. He uses the devices of the opponents and throws them back at their faces: he says that he has tried and failed, and that makes it credible. The metaphor of alchemy is used as a central conceit for the poem in order to give a new twist to the conventional ideas about love and its experience. Such way of turning upside down in an unusual manner is Donne's powerful poetic strategy, which an intelligent reader can understand. For the purpose of argument, Donne uses the analogy of alchemic research and spiritual love, and then he proceeds on to attack his rival poets by drawing parallel between alchemy and platonic theory into the ground.

The final stanza voices the poet’s sense of future vindication over the critic. The poet expects that the rest of the world will “invoke” himself and his beloved, similar to the way Catholics invoke saints in their prayers. In this vision of the future, the lovers’ legend has grown, and they have reached a kind of sainthood. They are role models for all the world, because “Countries, towns, courts beg from above/A pattern of your love” (lines 44-45). From the lovers’ perspective, the whole world is present as they look into each other’s eyes; this sets the pattern of love that the world can follow.

Essay on canonization

essay on canonization

The final stanza voices the poet’s sense of future vindication over the critic. The poet expects that the rest of the world will “invoke” himself and his beloved, similar to the way Catholics invoke saints in their prayers. In this vision of the future, the lovers’ legend has grown, and they have reached a kind of sainthood. They are role models for all the world, because “Countries, towns, courts beg from above/A pattern of your love” (lines 44-45). From the lovers’ perspective, the whole world is present as they look into each other’s eyes; this sets the pattern of love that the world can follow.

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