Women in nazi germany essay

As housewives and mothers, their lives were controlled. Women were not expected to wear make-up or trousers. The dyeing of hair was not allowed nor were perms. Only flat shoes were expected to be worn. Women were discouraged from slimming as this was considered bad for child birth. Women were encouraged to have a well built figure as slim women, so it was taught, would have problems in pregnancy…….Women were also discouraged from smoking – not because it was linked to problems with pregnancies – but because it was considered non-German to do so.

In 1941, tobacco smoking in trams was outlawed in sixty German cities. [38] Smoking was also outlawed in bomb shelters ; however, some shelters had separate rooms for smoking. [7] Special care was taken to prevent women from smoking. The President of the Medical Association in Germany announced, "German women don't smoke". [39] Pregnant women and women below the age of 25 and over the age of 55 were not given tobacco ration cards during World War II. Restrictions on selling tobacco products to women were imposed on the hospitality and food retailing industry. [38] Anti-tobacco films aimed at women were publicly shown. Editorials discussing the issue of smoking and its effects were published in newspapers. Strict measures were taken in this regard and a district department of the National Socialist Factory Cell Organization (NSBO) announced that it would expel female members who smoked publicly. [40] The next step in the anti-tobacco campaign came in July 1943, when public smoking for persons under the age of 18 was outlawed. [12] [33] [38] In the next year, smoking in buses and city trains was made illegal, [15] on the personal initiative of Hitler, who feared female ticket takers might be the victims of passive smoking. [7]

The Law for the Encouragement of Marriage gave newly wed couples a loan of 1,000 marks, and allowed them to keep 250 marks for each child they had. Mothers who had more than eight children were given a gold medal. Unmarried women could volunteer to have a baby for an Aryan [ Aryan : a person of European decent (not Jewish) often with blond hair and blue eyes - the Nazis viewed as the superior human race ] member of the SS [ SS : Also known as the Blackshirts. A German police/ military style organisation created to serve as the personal bodyguards of Adolf Hitler. In Hitler's Germany they eventually controlled the intelligence, security and police forces, and extermination of those they considered undesirable. ] .

What I felt was really relevant when I was writing this book was the question of, what did ordinary Germans — the people whose lives sort of touched very peripherally on the darkness — experience during that time, and how did they let this happen? How did they either not see it, or blind themselves to it? It felt to me like those questions are becoming more and more pertinent in America, and there was very little written about them as I started to investigate what other books were out there. The lens through which we see the Holocaust and World War II is so often the very important lens of the victims' perspective and the perspective of the Allies and the liberators — but then, I feel like now that that has become part of our canon, we can also step back and start thinking how, and starting to look at the German experience, the experience of the complicit and the enablers.

Women in nazi germany essay

women in nazi germany essay

What I felt was really relevant when I was writing this book was the question of, what did ordinary Germans — the people whose lives sort of touched very peripherally on the darkness — experience during that time, and how did they let this happen? How did they either not see it, or blind themselves to it? It felt to me like those questions are becoming more and more pertinent in America, and there was very little written about them as I started to investigate what other books were out there. The lens through which we see the Holocaust and World War II is so often the very important lens of the victims' perspective and the perspective of the Allies and the liberators — but then, I feel like now that that has become part of our canon, we can also step back and start thinking how, and starting to look at the German experience, the experience of the complicit and the enablers.

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